Air Temperatures The following high temperatures (F) were recorded across the state of Hawaii Saturday…along with the low temperatures Saturday:

86 – 75  Lihue, Kauai
91 – 76  Honolulu, Oahu – broke the record of 90 Saturday
88 – 72  Molokai AP
9066  Kahului AP, Maui 
87 – 76  Kona AP, Hawaii
82 – 73 Hilo, Hawaii

Here are the latest 24-hour precipitation totals (inches) for each of the islands Saturday afternoon:

0.14  Mount Waialeale, Kauai
0.01  Poamoho RG 1, Oahu
0.00  Molokai
0.00  Lanai
0.01  Kahoolawe
0.00  Maui
0.32  Saddle Quarry, Big Island

The following numbers represent the strongest wind gusts (mph) Saturday afternoon:

27  Port Allen, Kauai
21  Kii, Oahu
18  Molokai
24  Lanai
24  Kahoolawe
29  Maalaea Bay, Maui
31  Kealakomo, Big Island

Hawaii’s MountainsHere’s a link to the live webcam on the summit of our tallest mountain Mauna Kea (13,803 feet high) on the Big Island of Hawaii. Here’s the webcam for the 10,000+ feet high Haleakala Crater on Maui. These webcams are available during the daylight hours here in the islands, and at night whenever there’s a big moon shining down. Also, at night you will be able to see the stars, and the sunrise and sunset too…depending upon weather conditions.

 

https://www.ssd.noaa.gov/goes/west/tpac/ft-animated.gif
A dissipating cold front to the northwest

(click on the images to enlarge them)

 

https://www.ssd.noaa.gov/goes/west/cpac/ir4.jpg
An area of moisture clipping the Big Island…a couple of thunderstorms further south

 

https://www.ssd.noaa.gov/goes/west/hi/ir4.jpg
Clear to partly cloudy…some cloudy areas

 

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A few showers locally…mostly around the Big Island
Looping image

 

 

  High Surf Advisory…purple color below

Small Craft Advisory…pink color below

https://www.weather.gov/wwamap/png/hfo.png

 


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Hawaii Weather Narrative
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Broad Brush Overview: The trades will blow in the moderate to stronger range this weekend, as the pressure gradients increase between a weak ridge to the north, and a passing trough south of the state. A dry trade wind weather pattern will continue for most other islands into the first half of the new week ahead. One exception to this dry pattern will be over the Big Island, as an area of unstable moist air moves over that island. Trade wind speeds will decrease into the light to moderate range Monday onward.

Details: Generally favorable weather conditions will persist across most of the state. A high pressure ridge north of the islands will interact with a weak trough passing to the south of the state, which will increase the trades. Radar imagery shows some showers developing over windward mountains. The upper air balloon soundings show a stable subsidence inversion around 6000 feet in Lihue, rising up to 10,000 feet level in Hilo…due to the arrival of deeper unstable moisture.

Enhanced showers will continue to develop along east and southeast slopes of the Big Island as this weak trough of low pressure passes by south of the island. Elsewhere, an upper level ridge of high pressure along with drier more stable air, will keep clouds and showers to a minimum across the rest of the state. Moderate to stronger trades will continue through Sunday, due to a stronger ridge north of the islands…and the passing trough of low pressure to the south of the island chain.

Looking further ahead: The models continue to show a fairly dry trade wind weather pattern over the state through the end of next week. Trade wind speeds will decrease into the light to moderate range Monday onward. Land and sea breezes will develop along more sheltered western leeward slopes. Scattered showers will favor windward and mountain areas, trending towards the overnight and early morning hours as usual. Finally, no tropical cyclones will spin up through at least the next 5-days.

Here’s a near real-time Wind Profile of the Pacific Ocean – along with a Closer View of the islands / Here’s the latest Weather Map

Marine Environmental Conditions: A Small Craft Advisory (SCA) is now in effect for the typically windy waters around the Big Island and Maui through early Sunday morning…likely to be extended into the middle of next week.

Elevated surf is expected along south facing shores through this weekend. A new south-southwest swell will peak, with the swell gradually declining Sunday. Several reinforcing south-southwest swells will continue to produce average summer surf through middle of next week.

A northwest swell is expected into Sunday, and will continue to produce surf in the small to moderate range along north facing shores through the weekend. Additional pulses of tiny northwest swell are expected through next week. Surf along east facing shores will remain small through the weekend…then rise early in the new week.

 

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World-wide Tropical Cyclone Activity

 

>>> Here’s Saturday’s Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) Weather Wall Presentation covering the eastern, central, and western Pacific Ocean, the Indian Ocean, and the Arabian Sea…including Tropical Cyclone 02A (Vayu)

>>> Here’s Saturday’s Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) Weather Wall Presentation covering the Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean Sea, and the Gulf of Mexico


>>> Atlantic Ocean: There are no active tropical cyclones

Tropical cyclone formation is not expected during the next 5 days

>>> NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center is predicting that a near-normal Atlantic hurricane season is most likely this year. This outlook forecasts a 40% chance of a near-normal season, a 30% chance of an above-normal season and a 30% chance of a below-normal season. The hurricane season officially extends from June 1 to November 30.

For 2019, NOAA predicts a likely range of 9 to 15 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 4 to 8 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 2 to 4 major hurricanes (category 3, 4 or 5; with winds of 111 mph or higher). NOAA provides these ranges with a 70% confidence. An average hurricane season produces 12 named storms, of which 6 become hurricanes, including 3 major hurricanes.

Latest satellite image of the Atlantic

>>> Gulf of Mexico: There are no active tropical cyclones

Tropical cyclone formation is not expected during the next 5 days

Latest satellite image of the Gulf of Mexico

>>> Caribbean Sea: There are no active tropical cyclones

Tropical cyclone formation is not expected during the next 5 days

Here’s a satellite image of the Caribbean Sea…and the Gulf of Mexico

>>> Eastern Pacific: There are no active tropical cyclones

Tropical cyclone formation is not expected during the next 5 days

>>> A 70% chance of an above-normal season is predicted for both the eastern and central Pacific regions. The eastern Pacific outlook calls for a 70% probability of 15 to 22 named storms, of which 8 to 13 are expected to become hurricanes, including 4 to 8 major hurricanes.

Here’s the link to the National Hurricane Center (NHC)

>>> Central Pacific: There are no active tropical cyclones

Tropical cyclone formation is not expected during the next 5 days

>>> The central Pacific outlook calls for a 70% probability of 5 to 8 tropical cyclones, which includes tropical depressions, tropical storms, and hurricanes.

Here’s the link to the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC)

>>> Northwest Pacific Ocean: There are no active tropical cyclones

>>> South Pacific Ocean: There are no active tropical cyclones

>>> North and South Indian Oceans / Arabian Sea: 

Tropical Cyclone 02A (Vayu)

JTWC textual advisory
JTWC graphical track map

 

Interesting: This ‘Doomsday Plane’ Can Survive a Nuclear Attack — The U.S. Air Force’s E-4B, otherwise known as the “doomsday plane” may be able to withstand the force of a nuclear detonation.

This mostly windowless Boeing 747 was designed during the Cold War, and it indeed looks like a blast from the past, according to CNBC’s Amanda Macias who recently got an inside look at the plane.

The craft is equipped with older analog flight instruments, rather than modern digital technology. The analog equipment is less likely to be fried by the electromagnetic pulse released after a nuclear blast, they reported. It also has shielding to protect its crew from nuclear and thermal effects during a nuclear war.

With its giant fuel tanks and ability to refuel in the air from other aircraft, the doomsday plane can stay airborne for several days. It holds 67 satellite dishes and antennas, meaning its crew can communicate with anyone, anywhere in the world, even sending messages to the Navy’s ballistic missile submarines, according to DefenseNews.

That being said, most of its capabilities are classified, according to CNBC. The Air Force has four of these E-4B aircraft, each standing at nearly 6 stories tall. Sporting 18 bunks, six bathrooms, a galley and a briefing room among other rooms, each can fly 112 crew members.

Currently, one is being used by Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan to travel to various parts of the world. On May 28, he boarded the craft in Maryland en route to Asia for a weeklong trip.